Autumn Wreath for the Little Ones to Make

This is a simple and fun activity that my grandchildren, ages 18 months and two and a half years, and I made last week.

Gather leaves, flower petals, seed pods, acorns and small pinecones with the children. Some of the nature items from our collection came from my yard and some from theirs.

IMG_6693Ready to begin, we covered the table with our trusty vinyl tablecloth, and while I cut out the circles on two Chinet brand paper plates, the toddlers got to work choosing which treasures to glue on. IMG_6559They each enjoyed squeezing the glue out and pressing leaves on. We chatted about the different colors, smells, and shapes of the leavesIMG_6560IMG_6561Once the creations were dry, I tied a bit of twine in the back to hang and added a twine bow in the front. So easy. Such fun!

One for Mama and Daddy’s house and one for Grandma and Grandpa’s.IMG_6567 (1)A perfect added touch to welcome Thanksgiving guests.

San Luis Obisbo Children’s Garden

Not long ago I had the good fortune to be visiting one of my favorite cities, San Luis Obisbo, along the central California coast. While there, I spent a relaxing morning at the beautiful Botanical Garden. It’s true, that during my travels, looking for interesting gardens to visit is always high on my priority list, but because of my background in the child development field, it’s impossible for me to hide my excitement when I come across a thoughtfully and well designed children’s garden, such as this. I loved strolling through the botanical gardens, but this was a surprise bonus!


I wandered alone with a big smile on my face, wishing I had a couple of little ones with me to explore the alphabet soup garden, kitchen garden, the sensory garden, the herb spiral garden, and more.


Look at the tree stumps painted to look like toad stools!


A tree with low branches and even an invitation to climb. What child could possibly resist?


This little fort is called the Oak Den Hideaway.


Around the bend, I came across the Zoo Garden planted with Monkey Paws, Cat Mint, Lion’s Tail, etc.


Oh, look at this Dig It Garden and all the tools!



Why, there’s even a worm box to learn about vermiculture!


Here’s the sensory garden. How many colors can you find? Can you find a plant that is fuzzy? How does that leaf smell? Can you describe the way lemon balm tastes? Oh, and listen… do you hear the birds overhead? It’s all here.IMG_3702

The entire garden is made up of useful and edible plants.IMG_3701Well, it goes without saying that this enchanting hands-on environment was created by people who know children very well. What a delightfully fun space for children to explore and experience nature and gardening!